AVIATION AT HAMBLE

Updated 16th September 2012

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AVIATION AT HAMBLE

OTHER PAGES BY DEREK HASELDEN


AVIATION AT HAMBLE MESSAGE BOARD

College of Air Training Reunion 2013

Friday 10th May 2013, 7.30pm
Smith's Aerostructures (formerly British Aerospace) Social Club


Message for E.F. Webb...
I recently tried to e-mail you but only have an old address for you which is no longer valid. I have some information for you regarding your message further down this page.
Derek Haselden.


Dear Derek,
I am looking for a very special old friend of mine - Mr. Kouros Dokhanian, who was a student at Hamble in 1958 and and 1959. I am Gitta-Carmen (Carmen for short) and a very dear friend of his from Berlin. We met in Bournemouth where I was a language student... My phone number is 01202 522260 and I would be very grateful if you or anyone else connected to Hamble who knows of his wherabouts would contact me. If you could find him for me it would be more than wonderful and a dream come true.
Thank you so much.


Re: Air Service Training at Hamble
Do you think that, via your contacts, it is possible to find out if the names of John Priestley Sherburn Phillips & Mary Hindmarsh were in any way connected with Hamble during the war years? It is likely that Mary Hindmarsh was some kind of driver, & Mr Hindmarsh could have been (but this is by no means certain) RAF but I don`t even know if this is likely in the Hamble context.

Thank you.
E.F.Webb.


Does anyone have a photograph which includes Graham Stewart who died flying Chipmunk G-ARME over the IOW in 1966? Graham flew from Hamble Training College and was aged 19 when he died.

Many Thanks.
Chris Trevitt
Trevitt5@aol.com


Hi Derek,
Found your aviation website very interesting. I too am an aviation enthusiast, having served an apprenticeship with Supermarines, now retired but am a volunteer at Solent Sky (Thursdays). I was particulary interested in a reference I found to Sydney Lodge Estate, being taken over to form one of the airfields in about 1939, and owned by the Earl of Hardwicke. I knew the Earl and his family quite well in the late 1940s, early 1950s as they lived at Rockley Manor near my home in Marlborough, Wilts. I am trying to link the two places, and any information you have would be welcome.

Yours,
Garth Pearce
Hythe
Hants.


Hi Derek,
Excellent website. Took me back to a cold and windy day in 1952 - 19 February it was - when I was in the Air Training Corps and made my first flight in Tiger Moth DE670 of 14 RFS from Hamble. I've never forgotten it, and I have been looking for a photograph of that aircraft or what its fleet number (the only thing I didn't make a note of at the time) was. If you know of anyone who might be able to let me have a photograph or who might know what the fleet number (most probably a two digit number, the first digit of which might possibly have been a '2') painted on the fuselage in front of the roundel was I really should be most grateful.

Kind regards,
John Browne


Hi,
I am trying to get some information for a family history about a previous student at Hamble CAT. His name is Michael (Mike) Kennedy, born in 1946. I think he would have joined whilst still at school in Camberley - in about 1962. Do you have, or can you point me in the direction of, and information? I understand that, on graduation, he joined BEA.

Thank you,
Anthea Dore


BACK TO TOP Map of Hamble area showing aviation sites | Notes about the map | The numbered aviation sites | Chronological history of aviation at Hamble | Photographs | Military Units formerly based at Hamble | Accidents involving Hamble aircraft | The College of Air Training | College of Air Training aircraft | Hamble Aerodrome - 20 years on | Endnotes and Links

Click on the pictures below to jump to a larger version...

Hamble aviation sites Avro 504 Avro Avian AW27 Fairey IIID Piper Cherokee 'G-AVNS' Beech Baron 'G-AWAG' College of Air Training crest College, main hangar in 1981 College, main hangar, date unknown Hamble's flarepath DH Chipmunk 22 'G-ARMG' DH Chipmunk T10 'WD346' DH Chipmunk T10 'WP800' DH Chipmunk DH Chipmunk DH Chipmunk DH Chipmunk G-ARMG Piper Cherokee Piper Cherokee Piper Cherokees Piper Cherokee 'G-AXZD' Piper Cherokee 'G-AXZD' panel Beechcraft Baron Beechcraft Baron Beechcraft Baron Beechcraft Baron Beechcraft Baron Beechcraft Baron Piper Caribbean 'G-ARCC' Approaching Hamble Overhead Hamble Overhead Hamble Approaching Popham

BACK TO TOP Notes about the map | The numbered aviation sites | Chronological history of aviation at Hamble | Photographs | Military Units formerly based at Hamble | Accidents involving Hamble aircraft | The College of Air Training | College of Air Training aircraft | Hamble Aerodrome - 20 years on | Endnotes and Links

MAP OF THE HAMBLE AREA SHOWING AVIATION SITES

Hamble aviation sites

The above map shows the Hamble area and sites of aviation interest are indicated by the white numbers on blue discs. The map is based on 1 kilometre squares and covers an area of 5 x 5 kilometres centred on Ordnance Survey Great Britain grid reference SU 480070. (Click on the map to see this at full size, use your browser's 'Back' button to return to this page.)

BACK TO TOP Map of Hamble area showing aviation sites | The numbered aviation sites | Chronological history of aviation at Hamble | Photographs | Military Units formerly based at Hamble | Accidents involving Hamble aircraft | The College of Air Training | College of Air Training aircraft | Hamble Aerodrome - 20 years on | Endnotes and Links

NOTES ABOUT THE MAP

The numbered aviation sites are shown thus:

Aviation sites are shown by the numbered discs, white numeral on a blue background.
Principal roads are shown in red (A-roads), orange (B-roads) and brown (other roads).

The black line at top is part of the railway branch line that runs from St. Denys (Southampton) to Fareham. Hamble and Netley railway stations are indicated by red discs. For the sake of posterity the siding/goods line from Hamble Station to the British Petroleum Storage Depot is shown as well. The goods line is largely intact and usable (with a little gardening) but has not been used for several years.

It now seems doubtful that it will ever be used again in the near future since the points that permitted trains to get onto and off the St.Denys/Fareham branch line have been disabled. It may be interesting to note that when the railway line was built in the first few years of the 20th century the line from St. Denys originally terminated at Netley. But, a goods line was provided to what was then an new Admiralty depot on the site of the BP storage depot. Later, the branch line was extended to Fareham, doubled (it was originally single track) but the Admiralty line was retained. Those familiar with Hamble aerodrome might remember that the airfield had the pecularity of a railway level crossing bisecting a taxiway!

BACK TO TOP Map of Hamble area showing aviation sites | Notes about the map | Chronological history of aviation at Hamble | Photographs | Military Units formerly based at Hamble | Accidents involving Hamble aircraft | The College of Air Training | College of Air Training aircraft | Hamble Aerodrome - 20 years on | Endnotes and Links

THE NUMBERED AVIATION SITES

1.
Hamble (North) Aerodrome: The green area shows the approximate extent of the airfield perimeter and the light green strip the approximate alignment of the main runway used. Although there was room to deviate from that alignment there were permanent markings at either end of the strip: '36' (North); '18' (South). Another runway alignment often used was 02/20. The parking areas and two hangars are shown as well. The training school, administration buildings and student accomodation were primarily sited to the west of the rail siding/goods line where it runs north-south before crossing the main road (Hamble Lane) south of the airfield.

The whole area including the hangars, concrete aprons and school have now been covered by new housing and the new roads are all named with some connection to aviation at Hamble. These include: Tutor Close, Astral Gardens, Baron Road, Barton Drive, College Close, Aquila Way, Pegasus Close, Spitfire Way, Cirrus Gardens, Admirals Way and Captain Close.

Airfields are assigned a four-letter code, sometimes referred to as a 'Pundit Code', Hamble (North) was coded 'EGHM', the WWII code was 'HA'. The following information would probably be a summary of information contained in NOTAM (NOtice To AirMen) publications...

HAMBLE  'EGHM'
Lat:  50° 51' 33" North  Ordnance Survey GB Grid Reference SU 477077
Long: 01° 19' 36" West   80 feet above sea level
Ident 'HA'                4 miles S/E of Southampton

RUNWAYS:
Grass (all fields).
North - 18/36, 940 x 46 Metres (3084ft x 150ft). Also available - 02/20
In addition the entire manoeuvering area may be used"(Pooleys Guide 1972)

LIGHTING:
Runway (portable paraffin flares). Threshold (portable VASI). Taxiway (portable red, white lights) 

2.
Site of British Marine Aircraft, (1935 - Grid ref SU 469072) - later Folland, then Hawker Siddeley, then British Aerospace (BAe), now Smiths Aerospace. This is now the sole surviving site of aviation activity at Hamble. Here, assemblies for Hawk and Harrier jets are made. This site is quite extensive and is accessed by Kings Avenue although of course the works are private property.

3.
Hamble South airfield - (AVRO 1916). This site is now taken up by the area to the north-west and south of Ensign Way.

4.
Armstrong Whitworth Factory. This site is now taken up by the area covered by the works in Ensign Way and Mitchell Point.

5.
No.1 (southern) Marine Acceptance Depot (1917 - Grid ref SU 478061). The British Petroleum storage depot off Copse Lane marks this site. The rail siding originally served the Admiralty who were based in this area until after World War One.

6.
Approximate location of "Browns" aerodrome. So far as I am aware no trace whatsoever remains of the airfield.

7.
Luke and Co, then Fairey Aviation (1915) approximate location. This is to the found at Hamble Point at the end of School Lane. At least one of the hangars remains in use for marine works.

BACK TO TOP Map of Hamble area showing aviation sites | Notes about the map | The numbered aviation sites | Photographs | Military Units formerly based at Hamble | Accidents involving Hamble aircraft | The College of Air Training | College of Air Training aircraft | Hamble Aerodrome - 20 years on | Endnotes and Links

A CHRONOLOGICAL HISTORY OF AVIATION AT HAMBLE

1912:

1913:

1914:

1915:

1916:

1917:

1919:

1921-1926:

1924:

1925:

1926:

1927:

1928:

1929:

1931:

1932:

1933:

1934:

1935:

1936:

1937:

1938:

1939:

1939-1945:

1940:

1941:

1942:

1943:

1945:

1946:

1947:

1950:

1952:

1958:

1959:

1960:

1979:

1982:

1983:

1984:

1985:

1986:

BACK TO TOP Map of Hamble area showing aviation sites | Notes about the map | The numbered aviation sites | Chronological history of aviation at Hamble | Military Units formerly based at Hamble | Accidents involving Hamble aircraft | The College of Air Training | College of Air Training aircraft | Hamble Aerodrome - 20 years on | Endnotes and Links

PHOTOGRAPHS OF SOME OF THE AIRCRAFT CONNECTED WITH HAMBLE

Avro 504

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Avro 504. This plane was built in some numbers at Hamble, production of ending in 1919. Training versions of the Avro 504 started being built in 1916 and overall production of the various types lasted 10 years. It was the Royal Flying Corps' first basic trainer. The Avro 504 was one of the most popular training aircraft of the WWI era and over the 10 year production run some 10,000 were built. It was initially used as a light bomber and ground attack aircraft before being used as a trainer and some 504's were still in use at the outbreak of WWII.
Photo: Dave Fagan.

Avro Avian

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Avro (model 581) Avian, This picture shows Bert Hinkler next to the Avro Avian (G-EBOV) which he flew on his record breaking flight from England to Australia in 1928.
Photo: Courtesy of the Hinkler House Memorial Museum.

AW27

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Armstrong Whitworth Ensign (AW27), the largest aircraft built at Hamble. Twelve of these were built at Hamble for Imperial Airways, some to be used on Empire mail routes, some for the European sector. The Ensign first flew on 24th January 1938. They were powered by four 850hp Armstrong Siddeley Tiger engines and could carry 40 passengers on shorter routes, 27 on the Empire routes. Cruising speed was about 170mph, range 800 miles. The planes were dogged by problems and were fitted with Wright Cyclone engines during WWII.
Photo: Dave Fagan.

Fairey IIID

Fairey IIID "Lusitania", used by the Portuguese Navy for a Trans-Atlantic flight from the Cape Verde Islands to the San Pedro Rocks (off the Brazilian coast) April 1922. The Fairey III series had a production run that covered several different versions which were used by the R.A.F., Fleet Air Arm, and other overseas air forces. It entered R.A.F. service in 1927 and was used as a light bomber and utility aircraft.
Photo: Dave Fagan.


BACK TO TOP Map of Hamble area showing aviation sites | Notes about the map | The numbered aviation sites | Chronological history of aviation at Hamble | Photographs | Accidents involving Hamble aircraft | The College of Air Training | College of Air Training aircraft | Hamble Aerodrome - 20 years on | Endnotes and Links

MILITARY UNITS FORMERLY BASED AT HAMBLE

As you may have already gathered from the 'History' section of this page Hamble was host to several military aviation units over the years, These units are detailed below. I am indebted to Tony Sedgwick who provided me with the following information...

The above list was extracted from a list written by Tony Sedgwick. The list details the aircraft used by military units at Hamble and includes the serial numbers (registrations), type, unit, and period deployed at Hamble as well as remarks. I had toyed with the idea of reproducing in full the entire list but since it covers some 7 sides of A4 paper... If you would like a copy please let me know.

BACK TO TOP Map of Hamble area showing aviation sites | Notes about the map | The numbered aviation sites | Chronological history of aviation at Hamble | Photographs | Military Units formerly based at Hamble | The College of Air Training | College of Air Training aircraft | Hamble Aerodrome - 20 years on | Endnotes and Links

ACCIDENTS INVOLVING HAMBLE AIRCRAFT

As with every kind of vehicle there will be accidents - no method of transport is completeley safe! In this respect Hamble has had its fair share of accidents and below is a list of mishaps at Hamble or Hamble's aircraft that have come to my attention. I am indebted to Dave Fagan and Tony Sedgewick who provided me with much of the information for this section.


DATE      TYPE                  REG.    COMMENT
30/04/19  Avro 534              -       Crashed on 1st flight.
29/08/19  Avro 539a             G-EALG  Damaged in accident.

13/01/20  Avro 534              G-EACQ  Damaged in accident, rebuilt as G-AUCQ.
25/05/21  Bristol Fighter       G-EAWZ  Damaged in accident.
15/07/21  Avro 534b             G-EAXM  Written off after accident.
19/06/26  Cierva C6C            J8068   Crashed.

26/03/30  Spartan               G-AAME  Damaged in accident.
27/03/30  Spartan               G-AAFR  Written off after accident.
08/06/31  A.W. Siskin III       G-ABHT  Crashed, Sarisbury Green, Hampshire.
17/04/32  Avro Cadet I          G-ACCM  Crashed, Purfleet, Essex.
18/07/32  Avro Avian IVM        G-ABKA  Caught fire at Heston.
04/06/34  Avro Cadet I          G-ACRY  Crashed into The Solent.
21/07/34  D.H. 53               G-EBQP  Crashed.
12/08/34  D.H. 84 Dragon        G-ACJM  Crashed landing Hamble.
??/10/34  AIRCO DH9J            G-AARS  Crashed near Hamble.
10/09/34  Avro Cadet I          G-ACUH  Crashed, Southampton.
06/02/36  Avro Cadet II         G-ADTM  Crashed, West End, Southampton.
25/08/37  Hawker Hart           K6532   Collided with Swordfish (L2740) at Gosport.
??/12/37  Short Calcutta        G-ABVH  Damaged beyond repair during a gale.
24/01/38  Miles Magister        L8901   Crashed, Calshot.
25/01/38  Miles Magister        L6895   Crashed, Hamble.
16/03/38  Hawker Hart           K4415   Collided with Avro Cadet G-ACCN (on the ground?).
16/03/38  Miles Magister        L6906   Crashed, Southampton Water.
07/05/38  Miles Magister        L5972   Crashed, Hamble.
13/06/38  Miles Magister        L6894   Crashed, Bursledon.
02/08/38  Hawker Audax          K7413   Crashed, Lymington.
07/12/38  Avro Cadet II         G-ADTZ  Crashed, Ansty.
24/01/39  Hawker Hind           K5526   Crashed, Hamble.
15/06/39  Hawker Audax          K7406   Wrecked during taxying accident at Hamble.
08/08/39  Avro Cadet II         G-ADTO  Crashed, Leicester.
17/12/39  Avro Cadet            G-ADTU  Damaged in accident.

28/03/40  Avro Cadet            G-ADTG  Damaged in ground accident.
??/04/40  Avro Cadet            G-ADTK  Damaged in accident.
08/06/40  Avro Cadet            G-AEIR  Crashed, Southampton Water.
10/07/40  Avro Cadet            G-ACNE  Written off after ground collision with Blackburn Shark.
10/08/40  Spitfire Mk.I         R6979   Damaged in landing accident.
16/09/40  Spitfire Mk.I         R6922   Damaged in landing accident.
28/12/40  Handley Page Hampden  ??      Crashed after take-off.
12/12/42  Fairchild Argus       EV774   Crashed, Hamble.
08/02/44  D.H. 82A Tiger Moth   DE929   Overturned on takeoff.
08/09/44  Spitfire Mk.IX        NH491   Damaged in landing accident.
22/12/44  Avro Anson I          N9573   Crashed.
26/11/47  D.H. 82A Tiger Moth   G-AHVZ  Crashed, Hamble.
06/01/49  Avro Anson I          MG564   Crashed, near Hamble.
23/01/49  D.H. 82A Tiger Moth   T7465   Crashed, Yarmouth, Isle of Wight.

26/03/50  D.H. 82A Tiger Moth   T6173   Crashed, South End.
19/04/51  Avro Anson T21        VV899   Crashed, into sea near Brixham.
12/03/52  Avro Anson T21        VV910   Crashed, Fawley.
22/03/53  D.H. Chipmunk 21      G-AMUD  Crashed, Porchfield, Isle of Wight.
28/11/54  D.H. Vampire FB5      VZ177   Collided with WE836 and pilot thrown out of aircraft near Hamble.
03/10/55  Hiller U12B           G-AOFK  Crashed, Hamble.
22/10/56  D.H. Chipmunk 21      G-AMUE  Crashed, Middle Wallop.
11/10/58  D.H. Chipmunk T10     WG353   Damaged beyond repair during landing at Hamble.

12/07/60  D.H. Chipmink T10     WP895   Damaged beyond repair during landing accident.
29/03/66  D.H. Chipmunk 22      G-ARME  Crashed at Sandown, Isle of Wight.
07/12/66  D.H. Chipmunk T10     WZ864   Collided with G-ATEA, crashed near Hamble.
07/12/66  D.H. Chipmunk 22      G-ATEA  (Was WG464) Collided with WZ864, crashed near Hamble.
10/01/67  Piper Apache 160      G-ASDH  Crashed at Netley Hospital.

27/02/70  Piper Cherokee        G-AVBD  Destroyed in mid-air collision, Bursledon. Pilot killed.
27/02/70  Piper Cherokee        G-AVBI  Destroyed in mid-air collision, Bursledon. Pilot killed.
??/??/71  Piper Cherokee        G-AVNS  Damaged during mid-air collision, IoW, Crew unhurt.
??/??/71  Piper Cherokee        ?-????  Damaged during mid-air collision, IoW, Crew unhurt.
09/12/71  Beechcraft Baron      G-AWAG  Damaged in landing accident, Hurn, Crew unhurt, rebuilt.
??/??/??  Beechcraft Baron      G-AWAF  Damaged in landing accident, rebuilt.
??/??/??  Beechcraft Baron      G-AWAO  Damaged in landing accident, rebuilt.

30/04/81  Piper Cherokee        G-AVBJ  Destroyed in mid-air collision, Warsash. Pilot killed.
30/04/81  Piper Cherokee        G-AXZC  Destroyed in mid-air collision, Warsash. Pilot killed.
24/02/84  Beechcraft Baron      G-AWAE  Damaged in landing accident, rebuilt.

PA-28 'G-AVNS'

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Piper Cherokee 'G-AVNS', as seen in the main hangar at Hamble, Spring 1971. Note the damage to the vertical stabiliser. This was caused by the propeller of another Hamble Cherokee mid-air somewhere over the Isle of Wight! I can only say that the crews of the two aircraft (all landed safely and unhurt) must have used up a life in the process. (Click on the photo to see the full size version. Use the 'Back' button on your browser to return to this page.)
Photo: Dave Summers.

Beech Baron 'G-AWAG'

Beechcraft Baron 'G-AWAG'. It is often said that a crash is an uncontrolled landing and a landing is a controlled crash. In the case of this incident, it was a controlled landing - but with the wheels up! What had actually happened was that during an approach to Cherbourg the wheels failed to lower, both electrical and manual back-up systems had malfunctioned. The plane was then flown to Hurn (Bournemouth), both engines shut down at 200 feet, starter motors used to 'kick' the propeller blades horizontal and then glide in for a slide down the runway. I expect that this tale would be better told by those who where there, all the same it does strike me as a fine bit of airmanship. (Click on the photo to see the full size version. Use the 'Back' button on your browser to return to this page.)
Photo: Dave Summers.


The above list details some of the incidents that I'm aware of but there are doubtless others that elude this list. During the time that I was actually working at the College there were a few incidents involving Hamble and its aircraft. One of the above listed accidents involving Beechcraft Baron's was where the nosewheel undercarraige collapsed on landing. On at least 2 occasions Baron's landed at Hamble - with the undercarraige retracted! On another occasion a Cherokee was damaged on the ground when it struck a tree and pinioned around into a perimeter fence. Fortunately, the incidents cited in this paragraph involved little or no injury.

BACK TO TOP Map of Hamble area showing aviation sites | Notes about the map | The numbered aviation sites | Chronological history of aviation at Hamble | Photographs | Military Units formerly based at Hamble | Accidents involving Hamble aircraft | College of Air Training aircraft | Hamble Aerodrome - 20 years on | Endnotes and Links

College of Air Training crest

THE COLLEGE OF AIR TRAINING

The College was formed in 1960 to meet a growning need for civilian pilots prompted by the explosion of jet travel. Although my knowledge of the College at this time is scant, AST, who were already at Hamble provided training for civil and military pilots. The then flag carriers for the United Kingdom, British European Airways (BEA) and the British Overseas Airways Corporation (BOAC) needed their own school to train pilots and the College of Air Training was formed as a result when AST moved out of Hamble and established a flying school in Perth.

When BEA and BOAC later merged to form British Airways (BA) that trend continued. Up to that time the College was funded by BA but when privatisation loomed the inevitable cuts ensued. I was one of the unfortunate victims of that movement toward private ownership. In the end when funding ran out sometime in 1984 the College closed for good. I recall that there were plans to set up another training school but these came to nothing. Having been made redundant in the first staff cuts in 1982 I all but lost contact with the College itself and those I worked with. During the time that I worked at Hamble my main tasks were the maintenance and repair of instrument and electrical systems.

College, main hangar in 1981

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At left is a photo taken in 1981 of the main hangar and some of the aircraft parked outside. The control tower can be seen in the background. Note the vehicles visible next to the hangar; a dark green Mini Moke (used for towing aircraft), the red fire tender (and blue ambulance just visible behind it). Aircraft visible in the photograph are; at left Piper Cherokee 'G-AYAV'; on the right are Beechcraft Baron's 'G-AWAF', 'G-AWAL', and one other Baron, registration unknown. (Click on the photo to view it full size, use your browser's 'Back' button to get back to this page.)
Photo: Derek Haselden

College, main hangar, date unknown

At left is a photo (date uncertain) of the main hangar with aircraft parked outside. Beechcraft Baron 'G-AWAL' is in the foreground. (Click on the photo to view it at a larger size, use your browser's 'Back' button to get back to this page. The full size version of this photo may be accessed by using the following link... Large photo.)
Photo: Don Eaves.


On the whole, the College was very self contained. All its aircraft were maintained and repaired by its own staff (of whom I was one) and all the planes could be accomodated overnight in the two hangars. The airfield had its own fire crew, marshallers, control tower, and maintenance staff among many other ancilliary workers. The school itself covered a large area and included simulator rooms, a library, meteorology, engines, airframes and navigation class rooms. Students were housed in several accomodation blocks - in short, a village within the village of Hamble.

The airfield itself was a large grassed area and could offer over 3000 feet of runway in the roughly North/South directions and a little under 3000 feet in most other directions apart from East/West. The whole grassed area was available for aircraft movements and concrete aprons offered hardstandings for all the aircraft in use. An unusual aspect of the apron was that a link taxiway crossed the railway line (you can see this on the map) and must have made Hamble's aircraft movements peculiar in that planes had to be on the lookout for trains!

Being a grass strip there were few permanent features but one temporary feature of the airfield is worth describing here. Flying operations frequently carried on into the late evening so a form of portable airfield lighting was needed. The runway itself was marked by two rows of flares which consisted of a few dozen long-spouted metal watering cans. The can was filled with paraffin and the spout had a wick which when lit would burn for about 6-8 hours. Thus Hamble really did have a flare path! And most effective it was too - on several occasion I went on flights to and from Hamble and the flares could be seen from several miles away, more effective than some airfield electric lighting.

Another advantage of this lighting was that it tended to floodlight the runway and not just mark it, and the heat from the flares was often enough to disperse fog and mist, not unlike that WWII runway lighting aid FIDO - a contrivance of almost staggering waste which involved rows of petrol fed pipes and burners lit during foggy conditions.

The simple graphic below will give you a rough idea of how it would have appeared to an approaching aircraft...

Hamble's flarepath

The extents of the runway were marked with red lights (far end) and green lights (landing/take-off end) which could only be seen from one direction thus ensuring that the take-off/landing direction in use couldn't be too easily confused. At the landing threshold end of the runway a set of 4 portable Visual Approach Slope Indicator (VASI) lights were placed either side of the runway, two each side. This provided pilots with a visual landing aid. Basically: All reds = too low; All whites = too high; white and red both sides = correct landing approach glideslope. Finally, the alloted taxiway was marked with small red and white lights. All of these lighting fixtures were portable and had to be put out before the start of night flying. One of my jobs at Hamble was charging and maintaining the batteries that powered these lights.

BACK TO TOP Map of Hamble area showing aviation sites | Notes about the map | The numbered aviation sites | Chronological history of aviation at Hamble | Photographs | Military Units formerly based at Hamble | Accidents involving Hamble aircraft | The College of Air Training | Hamble Aerodrome - 20 years on | Endnotes and Links

COLLEGE OF AIR TRAINING AIRCRAFT

The College used three types of aircraft for its training during the time that I worked there. All were piston engined and could cater for a variety of training needs - from basic flying, right the way up to multi-engined flight under Instrument Flying Rules.

Early in the College's history Piper Apache aircraft were used but these were replaced by the Beechcraft Baron's in the late 60's.

Aircraft Specification: Piper Apache PA-23 160.
First flown: 1958.
Seats: 6; 2 front, 2 middle, 2 rear.
Engine: Two 250 hp Lycoming IO-520, air cooled.
Length:   31 ft, 2 in   Empty weight:   3321 lb   Max speed:  215 mph
Wingspan: 37 ft, 2 in   Max T/O weight: 5200 lb   Range:     1320 nm 
Height:   10 ft, 4 in   Thrust:          500 hp

The Apache's used by the College bore the following registrations:

G-ARJR, G-ARJS, G-ARJT, G-ARJU, G-ARJV, G-ARJW, G-ARJX, G-ASDG, G-ASDH, G-ASDI, G-ATOA.

HISTORY
G-ARJR  came to Hamble April 1961, sold 1968.
G-ARJS  came to Hamble April 1961, sold 1968.
G-ARJT  came to Hamble April 1961, sold 1968.
G-ARJU  came to Hamble April 1961, sold 1968.
G-ARJV  came to Hamble April 1961, sold 1968.
G-ARJW  came to Hamble April 1961, sold 1968.
G-ARJX  came to Hamble April 1961, sold 1968.
G-ASDG  came to Hamble January 1963, sold June 1969.
G-ASDH  came to Hamble January 1963, crashed near Netley Hospital 10th January 1967.
G-ASDI  came to Hamble Janaury 1963, sold June 1969.
G-ATOA  came to Hamble March 1966, sold August 1968.


de Havilland Chipmunk
The simplest plane used by the College of Air Training whilst I worked there was the de Havilland Chipmunk. This was a two-seat (tandem) low wing monoplane, fully aerobatic. It was powered by a Gypsy Major series 4-cylinder in-line inverted engine rated at about 140hp. The Chipmunk was quite an old plane and most of the flying surfaces were fabric covered. It had fixed undercarraige and was in most respects a very basic aircraft. It was however a very robust plane and its ruggedness and simplicity meant that despite a design rooted in the 1940's many examples of this plane are still in use today. The College's Chipmunks had a distinctive colour scheme of silver with a thin blue/red/white stripe along the fuselage. The wings, tail and tips bore fluorescent orange stripes.

Aircraft Specification: de Havilland Chipmunk
First flown: 1946
Seats: 2, one in front of the other.
Engine: 4-cyl 140hp Gypsy Major series, air cooled.
Length:   25 ft, 5 in   Empty weight:   1158 lb   Max speed: 139 mph
Wingspan: 34 ft, 4 in   Max T/O weight: 1930 lb   Range:     780 nm 
Height:    7 ft         Thrust:          145 hp

The Chipmunk's used by the College bore the following registrations:


G-AMUC, G-AMUF, G-AMUG, G-AMUH, G-AOUO, G-AOUP, G-AOZJ, G-AOJY, G-AOZV, G-ARMB, G-ARMC, G-ARMD, G-ARME, G-ARMF, G-ARMG, G-ATDE, G-ATDF, G-ATDP, G-ATDX, G-ATDY, G-ATEA, G-ATEB, G-ATHC, G-ATHD, G-ATJI, G-ATJJ, G-ATJK. HISTORY Reg. Prev. ID. Type G-AMUC - DH Chipmunk 21 came to Hamble October 1952, sold 1967. G-AMUF - DH Chipmunk 21 came to Hamble November 1952, sold 1967. G-AMUG - DH Chipmunk 21 came to Hamble November 1952, sold 1967. G-AMUH - DH Chipmunk 21 came to Hamble November 1952, sold 1967. G-AOUO WB730 DH Chipmunk 22 came to Hamble October 1956, sold 1967. G-AOUP WB731 DH Chipmunk 22 came to Hamble October 1956, sold 1967. G-AOZJ WD319 DH Chipmunk 22 came to Hamble October 1957, sold 1967. G-AOJY WB631 DH Chipmunk 22 came to Hamble December 1957, sold 1967. G-AOZV WD290 DH Chipmunk 22 came to Hamble December 1957, sold 1967. G-ARMB WB660 DH Chipmunk 22 came to Hamble September 1961, sold 1984. G-ARMC WB703 DH Chipmunk 22 came to Hamble September 1961, sold ? G-ARMD WB297 DH Chipmunk 22 came to Hamble September 1961, sold 1984? G-ARME WD381 DH Chipmunk 22 came to Hamble September 1961, crashed Sandown, Isle of Wight 29/03/66. G-ARMF WD322 DH Chipmunk 22 came to Hamble September 1961, sold 1984? G-ARMG WK558 DH Chipmunk 22 came to Hamble September 1961, sold May 1984. G-ATDE WB733 DH Chipmunk 22 came to Hamble June 1965, stored, returned to RAF December 1967. G-ATDF WP850 DH Chipmunk 22 came to Hamble June 1965, stored, returned to RAF December 1967. G-ATDP WG477 DH Chipmunk 22 came to Hamble June 1965, stored, returned to RAF December 1967. G-ATDX WG463 DH Chipmunk 22 came to Hamble June 1965, stored, returned to RAF December 1967. G-ATDY WG418 DH Chipmunk 22 came to Hamble June 1965, stored, returned to RAF December 1967. G-ATEA WG464 DH Chipmunk 22 came to Hamble August 1965, stored, returned to RAF December 1967. G-ATEB WZ866 DH Chipmunk 22 came to Hamble August 1965, stored, returned to RAF December 1967. G-ATHC WP969 DH Chipmunk 22 came to Hamble August 1965, stored, returned to RAF December 1967. G-ATHD WP971 DH Chipmunk 22 came to Hamble August 1965, stored, returned to RAF December 1967. G-ATJI WP863 DH Chipmunk 22 came to Hamble August 1965, stored, returned to RAF December 1967. G-ATJJ WP921 DH Chipmunk 22 came to Hamble August 1965, stored, returned to RAF December 1967. G-ATJK WP927 DH Chipmunk 22 came to Hamble August 1965, stored, returned to RAF December 1967.

Only two of these were kept in flying condition during the time that I was at the College, the others were stored for spares. The registrations of those that were at Hamble while I was there were: G-ARMB, G-ARMD, G-ARMF, G-ARMG.

DH Chipmunk 22 'G-ARMG'

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At left is one of the College's Chipmunks, 'G-ARMG', formerly 'WK558', previous user unknown. This aircraft first came to Hamble in September 1961 and was subsequently sold by the College in May 1984. Note the 'trolley' in front of the plane, within the trolley was a bank of batteries to help get the engine started.
Photo: Rod Brown.

DH Chipmunk T10 'WD346'

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At left is de Havilland Chipmunk T10 'WD346' as used by Southampton University Air Squadron. It first came to Hamble in January 1951 and was sold in March 1975.
Photo: Rod Brown.

DH Chipmunk T10 'WP800'

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Another Chipmunk that was at Hamble, 'WP800', from 1953 until March 1975. It too was used by Southampton University Air Squadron.
Photo: Rod Brown.

DH Chipmunk

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Yet another picture of a Chipmunk at Hamble, this time undergoing maintenance in the main hangar, plane registration unknown. Also visible is Piper Cherokee 'G-AVNM'.

And who are the people pictured? I'm told the fellow in white overalls is Geoff Mann. But, at this point there is some difference of opinion as to who the others are... There is a claim that the chap in blue overalls looking into the tool boxes next to the engine is Alan Norgate. Another claim is that it is Sandy Sadler. And, the man in dark blue overalls in the plane is not sure whether it is he, Mick Lavery. Perhaps a mystery to be solved at some future date!

(Click on the picture to view a larger version of this photograph, use the 'Back' button on your browser to return to this page. The full size version of this photo may be accessed by using the following link... Large photo.)
Photo: Don Eaves.

DH Chipmunk

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A view of two Chipmunks parked outside the main hangar, 'G-AMUF' and 'G-AMUG'. Perhaps the Cherokee is treating them to a flypast? (Click on the picture to view a larger version of this photograph, use the 'Back' button on your browser to return to this page. The full size version of this photo may be accessed by using the following link... Large photo.)
Photo: Don Eaves.

DH Chipmunk 'G-AMUF'

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Ex-Hamble Chipmunk 'G-AMUF' as seen at Redhill recently. (Click on the picture to view a larger version of this photograph, use the 'Back' button on your browser to return to this page.)
Photo: Derek Squires.

DH Chipmunk 22 'G-ARMG'

Another shot of former Hamble D.H. Chipmunk, 'G-ARMG', formerly 'WK558', recently restored and seen here in an air-to-air photo. In good flying condition and based in Warwickshire. (Click on the picture to view a larger version of this photograph, use the 'Back' button on your browser to return to this page.)
Photo: John Richards.



Piper Cherokee 180 (PA-28)
The main basic trainer aircraft used was the Piper Cherokee. This was powered by a single Lycoming O-360, flat 4-cylinder engine that was rated at about 150hp. The plane was a four-seater and was somewhat more luxurious in its layout than the Chipmunk.

Aircraft Specification: Piper Cherokee
First flown: 1964
Seats: 4, 2 front, 2 back.
Engine: Lycoming 0-360 150 hp flat-4 cyclinder, air cooled.
Length:   23 ft, 9 in   Empty weight:   1416 lb   Max speed: 147 mph
Wingspan: 35 ft         Max T/O weight: 2550 lb   Range:     630 nm 
Height:    7 ft, 3 in   Payload:         200 lb   Thrust:    150 hp

There were a total of 39 Cherokee's used by the College which bore the following registrations:

G-AVAX, G-AVAY, G-AVAZ, G-AVBA, G-AVBB, G-AVBC, G-AVBD, G-AVBE, G-AVBG, G-AVBH, G-AVBI, G-AVBJ, G-AVNM,
G-AVNN, G-AVNO, G-AVNP, G-AVNR, G-AVNS, G-AVNT, G-AVNU, G-AVNV, G-AVNW, G-AXZC, G-AXZD, G-AXZE, G-AXZF,
G-AYAA, G-AYAB, G-AYAP, G-AYAR, G-AYAS, G-AYAT, G-AYAU, G-AYAV, G-AYAW, G-AYBK, G-AYBT, G-AYEE, G-AYEF.

HISTORY
PA-28 180
G-AVAX  came to Hamble February 1967, sold May 1984.
G-AVAY  came to Hamble February 1967, sold July 1984, went to the United States.
G-AVAZ  came to Hamble February 1967, sold 1983.

G-AVBA  came to Hamble February 1967, sold ?
G-AVBB  came to Hamble March 1967, sold July 1984, went to United States, re-registered as N54590.
G-AVBC  came to Hamble March 1967, sold July 1984, went to United States.
G-AVBD  came to Hamble March 1967, destroyed in mid-air collision with G-AVBI over Bursledon 27/02/70.
G-AVBE  came to Hamble March 1967, sold July 1984, went to United States.
G-AVBG  came to Hamble March 1967, sold May 1983.
G-AVBH  came to Hamble March 1967, sold July 1983
G-AVBI  came to Hamble March 1967, destroyed in mid-air collision with G-AVBD over Bursledon 27/02/70
G-AVBJ  came to Hamble March 1967, destroyed in mid-air collision with G-AXZC over Warsash, 30/04/81.

G-AVNM  came to Hamble July 1967, sold 1983.
G-AVNN  came to Hamble August 1967, sold May 1984.
G-AVNO  came to Hamble August 1967, sold 1984.
G-AVNP  came to Hamble August 1967, sold 1983.
G-AVNR  came to Hamble August 1967, sold May 1984.
G-AVNS  came to Hamble August 1967, sold May 1984.
G-AVNT  came to Hamble August 1967, sold July 1984.
G-AVNU  came to Hamble August 1967, sold 1982.
G-AVNV  came to Hamble August 1967, sold July 1984.
G-AVNW  came to Hamble August 1967, sold 1984.

PA-28 180E
G-AXZC  came to Hamble March 1970, destroyed in mid-air collision with G-AVBJ over Warsash 30/04/81.
G-AXZD  came to Hamble March 1970, sold May 1984. Currently based in Hertfordshire.
G-AXZE  came to Hamble March 1970, sold July 1984.
G-AXZF  came to Hamble March 1970, sold January 1983, went to Carill Aviation, Southampton.

G-AYAA  came to Hamble March 1970, sold January 1983. 
G-AYAB  came to Hamble March 1970, sold January 1983.
G-AYAP  came to Hamble May 1970, sold January 1983.
G-AYAR  came to Hamble May 1970, sold June 1984.
G-AYAS  came to Hamble May 1970, sold May 1984.
G-AYAT  came to Hamble May 1970, sold November 1983. Currently based in Norfolk.
G-AYAU  came to Hamble June 1970, sold november 1983. Re-registered as G-ONET.
G-AYAV  came to Hamble June 1970, sold May 1984.
G-AYAW  came to Hamble June 1970, sold May 1984. Currently based at White Waltham.

G-AYBK  came to Hamble June 1970, sold July 1984.
G-AYBT  came to Hamble July 1970, sold July 1984.

G-AYEE  came to Hamble July 1970, sold May 1984.
G-AYEF  came to Hamble July 1970, sold May 1983.

Piper Cherokee

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A head-on view of College Piper Cherokee 'G-AYAV' parked outside the main hangar. (Click on the picture to view a larger version of this photograph, use the 'Back' button on your browser to return to this page.)
Photo: Derek Haselden

Piper Cherokee

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Another view of the same aircraft (previous picture) seen from the front and side. (Click on the picture to view a larger version of this photograph, use the 'Back' button on your browser to return to this page.)
Photo: Derek Haselden

Piper Cherokees

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A view of three Piper Cherokees parked on the apron in front of the main hangar; 'G-AVBH', 'G-AYAV', plus one other (registration unknown). Note the all white livery which was changed to red and white later on. (Click on the picture to view a larger version of this photograph, use the 'Back' button on your browser to return to this page. The full size version of this photo may be accessed by using the following link... Large photo.)
Photo: Don Eaves.

Piper Cheroke 'G-AXZD'

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A picture of a former Hamble Piper Cherokee 'G-AXZD', now in private hands, still flying, still in good condition. (Click on the picture to view a larger version of this photograph, use the 'Back' button on your browser to return to this page.)
Photo: Geoff Whitmore.

Piper Cheroke 'G-AXZD' panel

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The instrument/control panel of former Hamble Piper Cherokee 'G-AXZD'. Those of you who flew Hamble aircraft will notice that the panel is almost unchanged since it's Hamble days. (Click on the picture to view a larger version of this photograph, use the 'Back' button on your browser to return to this page.)
Photo: Geoff Whitmore.



Beechcraft Baron D55
The largest aircraft type used by the College of Air Training, of which there were 12, was the Beechcraft Baron, model D55. (The Beechcraft Baron replaced the Piper Apache used by the College during the early 60's.) The Baron was a 6-seater aircraft (up to 2 pilots and 4 passengers) powered by two Teledyne Continental IO-520 flat 6-cylinder, fuel injected engines rated at 285hp. The maximum speed of the plane was about 240mph with a range of about 1500 miles. It had retractable undercarraige and an unpressurised cabin.

Aircraft Specification: Beechcraft Baron B55
First flown: 1960
Seats: 6, 2 front, 2 middle, 2 rear. (College Baron's had the 2 rear seats removed.)
Engines: 2 x Teledyne Continental IO-520, flat-6-cylinder, air cooled, fuel injected.
Length:   29 ft, 10 in   Empty weight:   3570 lb   Max speed:  239 mph
Wingspan: 37 ft, 10 in   Max T/O weight: 5500 lb   Range:     1575 nm 
Height:    9 ft,  9 in   Payload:         700 lb   Thrust:     570 hp

The Baron's that were used by the College bore the following registrations:

G-AWAD, G-AWAE, G-AWAF, G-AWAG, G-AWAH, G-AWAI, G-AWAJ, G-AWAK, G-AWAL, G-AWAM, G-AWAN, G-AWAO.

HISTORY
G-AWAD  came to Hamble March 1968, sold December 1983. Re-registered as G-MOSS, was then based in Jersey.
                                                       Was later based at Elstree. Now in Portugal.
G-AWAE  came to Hamble March 1968, sold May 1984. Re-registered at 9J-MJS, Zambia.
G-AWAF  came to Hamble March 1968, sold July 1984.
G-AWAG  came to Hamble March 1968, sold June 1984.
G-AWAH  came to Hamble March 1968, sold ?
G-AWAI  came to Hamble March 1968, sold August 1982.
G-AWAJ  came to Hamble March 1968, sold June 1984.
G-AWAK  came to Hamble March 1968, sold June 1984.
G-AWAL  came to Hamble March 1968, sold July 1984.
G-AWAM  came to Hamble March 1968, sold July 1984.
G-AWAN  came to Hamble March 1968, sold July 1984.
G-AWAO  came to Hamble March 1968, sold May 1984.

Beechcraft Baron

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A head-on view of Beechcraft Baron 'G-AWAF'. (Click on the picture to view a larger version of this photograph, use the 'Back' button on your browser to return to this page.)
Photo: Derek Haselden

Beechcraft Baron

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A side-on view of the same aircraft ('G-AWAF'). This plane had recently undergone extensive repair after a wheels-up landing. (Click on the picture to view a larger version of this photograph, use the 'Back' button on your browser to return to this page.)
Photo: Derek Haselden

Beechcraft Baron

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Ex-Hamble Beechcraft Baron 'G-AWAD', now re-registered as 'G-MOSS'. This picture shows her as seen at Elstree aerodrome, Herts in 2004. (This aircraft is now based in Portugal apparently.) I was lucky enough to fly in this aircraft shortly before this photo was taken - ah, nostalgia isn't what it used to be! My thanks to the owner, Alberto Camisa, for inviting me to see and fly in 'one of my babies' some 22 years after I'd last seen her. (Click on the picture to view a larger version of this photograph, use the 'Back' button on your browser to return to this page.)
Photo: Derek Haselden

Beechcraft Baron

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Former Hamble Beechcraft Baron 'G-AWAH' as seen at Duxford recently. (Click on the picture to view a larger version of this photograph, use the 'Back' button on your browser to return to this page.)
Photo: Derek Squires.

Beechcraft Baron

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The same aircraft as the photo above but this time as seen during the 70's/80's at Hamble. (Click on the picture to view a larger version of this photograph, use the 'Back' button on your browser to return to this page.)
Photo: John Russell.

Beechcraft Baron

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Ex-Hamble Beechcraft Baron now re-registered as '9J-MJS' (formerly 'G-AWAE'). This aircraft was flown down to Zambia by the current owner, himself a former Hamble student. (Click on the picture to view a larger version of this photograph, use the 'Back' button on your browser to return to this page.)
Photo: Stephen Leniston.


The plane was equiped with a comprehensive avionics suite and was thus able to fly under Instrument Flying Rules (IFR). It made routine training flights all over England and occasional trips to the Channel Islands and Dinard in France. It was a quick plane and I always remember it for its distinctive engine sound and the fuel consumption: At take-off power it was not unusual to see the fuel-flow gauges register up to 24 gallons per hour - per engine! Fortunately this would drop to about 10 to 15 during the cruise phase of flight.

I did hear that some of these were eventually dismantled after the planes were auctioned off in 1984 and shipped to the United States for reassembly and reused. Perhaps someone can confirm that?

A list detailing the aircraft used by the College, including those taken over from Air Service Training in June 1960 was kindly given to me by Tony Sedgwick. The list includes: date to Hamble, registration, previous identity, type, and remarks. Again, like the military residents list I had toyed with the idea of reproducing the entire list on this page but since it covers 3 sides of A4 paper... If you would like a copy please let me know.

BACK TO TOP Map of Hamble area showing aviation sites | Notes about the map | The numbered aviation sites | Chronological history of aviation at Hamble | Photographs | Military Units formerly based at Hamble | Accidents involving Hamble aircraft | The College of Air Training | College of Air Training aircraft | Endnotes and Links

HAMBLE AERODROME - 20 YEARS ON

Sadly, very little remains of Hamble aerodrome today. The grassed area is still intact and still forms one of the largest, flat, open areas locally. However, nothing remains of the apron, hangars, school, or other buildings - all swept aside by 'progress'.

One of the many upshots of this webpage has been the amount of feedback I get, some from former employees, students, pilots, and aviators alike. One such occasion was August 2005 when I was invited to fly over Hamble. The following photos show some of that 'flip'...

Popham based PA-22 'G-ARCC'

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Popham based PA-22 'G-ARCC' (Piper Caribbean), shared aircraft that was my ride, flown by Mike Vernon, flight kindly arranged by John Grover. We flew south from Popham and headed towards Bishops Waltham and Fareham. Once given permission to penetrate part of Southampton air traffic zone we were able to circle over Hamble before flying back to Popham. (Click on the picture to view a larger version of this photograph, use the 'Back' button on your browser to return to this page.)
Photo: Derek Haselden

Approaching Hamble

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Photo taken from about 1500 feet, flying roughly south, looking west. The River Hamble is visible in the foreground. The airfield is the large green expanse at centre, Southampton Water is in the distance running left to right with Southampton Waterside area beyond. (Click on the picture to view a larger version of this photograph, use the 'Back' button on your browser to return to this page.)
Photo: Derek Haselden

Overhead Hamble

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The airfield is at centre of the photo, this view looking north, north west. Hamble village is at bottom left, Southampton is in the distance at top left, River Hamble at bottom right. (Click on the picture to view a larger version of this photograph, use the 'Back' button on your browser to return to this page.)
Photo: Derek Haselden

Overhead Hamble

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Looking down at the site where the hangars, apron, and control tower used to be, now covered with housing. The dark green line running from centre left to centre top is Hamble Lane. Bisecting the view running roughly up/down is a pale green/brown line running along the edge of the field and the housing, this is the former goods line that ran to and from the BP Depot. Those familiar with the area may be able to make out other features. (Click on the picture to view a larger version of this photograph, use the 'Back' button on your browser to return to this page.)
Photo: Derek Haselden

Approaching Popham

Towards the end of a nostalgic flight, on return to and approaching Popham, shortly before landing. (Click on the picture to view a larger version of this photograph, use the 'Back' button on your browser to return to this page.)
Photo: Derek Haselden


All in all a very enjoyable and nostalgic flight. I was quite gratified that over 20 years on I was still able to pick out the airfield about 10 miles out approaching from the north. Many landmarks stood out as visual references almost forgotten over time but suddenly being recalled to guide the way. I have often said that you've never really flown until you've flown in a light aircraft. Time and again a light aircraft has provided me with an unforgettable thrill and the flight over Hamble was no exception.

Much as I enjoyed that day out I have to say that it was tinged with sadness. Mike Vernon, the pilot, said that he'd flown over that area many times and would never have known that there was a historic airfield at Hamble. Indeed, it was only my knowledge of the area that provided clues as to where it was. As you can see from the above photos there is virtually no sign that Hamble Aerodrome ever existed.

I'm not sure what to feel about flying over the ghost of 'EGHM' - it was both exciting and a let down. The march of progress is unrelenting and things do change, sometimes for the better, sometimes not. What do you think?

BACK TO TOP Map of Hamble area showing aviation sites | Notes about the map | The numbered aviation sites | Chronological history of aviation at Hamble | Photographs | Military Units formerly based at Hamble | Accidents involving Hamble aircraft | The College of Air Training | College of Air Training aircraft | Hamble Aerodrome - 20 years on

ENDNOTES AND LINKS

I am still amazed at the amount of interest this page seems to have generated. Since posting this page on the internet I have been contacted by many people who worked or learned to fly at Hamble as well as receiving mail from all over the world. To visit the site of the former airfield one would hardly guess what was there not so very long ago. This page will hopefully keep those memories alive for people who have a connection to Hamble's aviation history.

As is the norm with this kind of page there were many useful sources of information who helped me write this webpage...

Firstly, my thanks to Dave Fagan who generously allowed me to use text and pictures from his expansive website about Aviation in Hampshire. Some of the chronological history written on this page comes courtesy of him as do the three black and white photo's further up on this page. Also, he has an extensive list of aircraft accidents that have taken place in Hampshire, some of which appear further up on this page.

Thanks also go to Tony Sedgwick who kindly allowed me to use text from his webpage about Hamble's Airfields. Some of the chronological history written on this page comes courtesy of him. That page is part of Hamble Local History Society's website. Tony also provided me with copious references to other aircraft based at Hamble.

More thanks go to Don Eaves of Solent Aviation Society who gave me several useful pointers in my search for information. Don has also subsequently dug up some further information about aircraft that had connections with Hamble as well as providing me with some pictures of College of Air Training aircraft. Some of these pictures appear further up this page.

I am also indebted to Rod Brown for supplying several pictures of de Havilland Chipmunks used at Hamble. His extensive website detailing the history and many other things concerning this famous training aircraft can be seen by using the following link. It is appropriately entitled 'Chipmunk Flyer'!

Thanks also to: Dave Summers, John Russell, Derek Squires, Stephen Leniston, Phil Nelson, and John Richards, for providing some photos.

Hamble-Le-Rice Parish Council were very helpful in directing me to sources of information. Their office in Memorial Hall, High Street, Hamble-Le-Rice has an excellent archive of pictures relating to Hamble aviation and the village itself.

Another round of thanks to John Grover and Mike Vernon from Popham Flying Group for arranging and flying me over Hamble in August 2005.

The photograph of the Avro Avian (and Bert Hinkler) flown by him on his record breaking flight from England to Australia was kindly supplied by the Hinkler House Memorial Museum, Bundaberg, Australia.

For those of you interested in reading more about aviation in Hampshire a book I thought worth buying was "Hampshire Airfields in the Second World War" by Robin Brooks (ISBN 1 85306 414 9) published by Countryside Books. There is a short section about Hamble within.

If you like quality photos of aircraft a website you might like to visit is Asian Aviation Photography run by David Riley. This site features exceptionally high quality portrait prints for sale of a wide variety of aircraft. Despite the name, Asian Aviation Photography offers pictures of aircraft from all over the world.

A list detailing the aircraft used by AST (Air Sevice Training) was kindly given to me by Tony Sedgwick. The list includes: date to Hamble, registration, previous identity, type, and remarks. Like the lists of military aircraft, and College of Air Training aircraft, I had thought posting the entire list on this page but it covers 3 sides of A4 paper... If you would like a copy please let me know.

Another list of aircraft, this time detailing aircraft resident at Hamble after British Airways sold out in August 1982 was given to me, again by Tony Sedgwick. The list includes: date to Hamble, registration, type, owner, and remarks. It covers 3 sides of A4 paper... If you would like a copy please let me know.

And that's it really. Thank you, all of you. I don't imagine for a second that this is a complete history, nor was it intended to be. If, however, anyone reading this page happens to know of any additional bits and pieces worth adding, or should you see any errors please do let me know, I'll be happy to add/correct them.
Derek Haselden

BACK TO TOP Map of Hamble area showing aviation sites | Notes about the map | The numbered aviation sites | Chronological history of aviation at Hamble | Photographs | Military Units formerly based at Hamble | Accidents involving Hamble aircraft | The College of Air Training | College of Air Training aircraft | Hamble Aerodrome - 20 years on | Endnotes and Links

This page is part of the personal web space of Derek Haselden.

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